Friday, January 20, 2012

Nehmes Bastet, Ancient Female Singer's Tomb, Found In Egypt's Valley Of The Kings

Archaeologists have come across a new discovery in Egypt's Valley of the Kings burial grounds. They have unearthed a roughttp://www.blogger.com/img/blank.gifhly 1,100 year-old tomb of a female singer.

It is the only tomb of a woman not related to the ancient Egyptian royal families ever found in the Valley of the Kings, said Mansour Boraiq, the top government official for the Antiquities' Ministry in the city of Luxor,

The Valley of the Kings in Luxor is a major tourist attraction. In 1922, archaeologists there unearthed the gold funerary mask of Tutankhamun and other stunning items in the tomb of the king who ruled more than 3,000 years ago.

Boraiq told The Associated Press that the coffin of the female singer is remarkably intact.

He said that when the coffin is opened this week, archaeologists will likely find a mummy and a cartonnage mask molded to her face and made from layers of linen and plaster.

The singer's name, Nehmes Bastet, means she was believed to be protected by the feline deity Bastet.


You may watch the video of the discovery below.
























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